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Shezmu Anubis Egyptian Essences Oils 10ml dropper, 9ml roller. Imported from Egypt

Shezmu Anubis Egyptian Essences Oils 10ml dropper, 9ml roller. Imported from Egypt

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Egyptian Oils  Shezmu Egyptian Anubis Essence Oil in 10 ml dropper/9ml roller

This is one of our Gods and Goddesses Collection

 Pure oils imported from Egypt. We store and use dark Amber and Cobalt Blue bottles.

ANUBIS

This oil is to help you to connect with the god Anubis.

 Anubis was also an embalmer. By the Middle Kingdom (c. 2055–1650 BC) he was replaced by Osiris in his role as lord of the underworld. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the "Weighing of the Heart", in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Anubis is one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods in the Egyptian pantheon, however no relevant myth involved him.[3]

 

SCENT: 

A scent that gives you a feeling of relaxation and sexy at the same time, with a clean floral scent like soap and a faint sweetness like resin. The god Anubis is said to be a mummy-making god, but in order to make a mummy, knowledge related to medicine would have been necessary. Also, making a mummy seems to have been a lot of hard work, which puts a strain on the body and mind. I imagine that this oil may have been used by people involved in mummification to heal the mind and body after doing hard work.

Fragrance system: Floral Musky

 

Ancient Egyptians were masters of the holistic and believed that beauty, magic, and medicine were inseparable to provide holistic therapy in such a manner that the body cannot be separated from the mind, soul, or spirit.

Ancient Egyptians were masters of the holistic and believed that beauty, magic, and medicine were inseparable.

It is believed that ancient Egyptians were the first in the world to invent extraction of flower essences, and they are credited as that some of the first perfumers in history. Egyptians were the first civilization to incorporate perfume into their culture.

 Egyptian Essences has a unique feature; it strengthens with body heat. As more and more of your body heat is released it becomes stronger, it, therefore, is a slow release perfume, making it long lasting when you apply it.

 

Everything Egyptian is at My Egypt. "Share the Passion"


We have a bricks and mortar store at Mudgeeraba Qld.

We import direct from our friends in Egypt to get the best Quality pieces. There is no slave or child labor with any of our goods. We support small Family Businesses which has a Flow on effect to the small families. This item is a great gift for yourself, someone who loves Egypt or is a pyramididot or just loves everything Egyptian.

History of Perfume

The word perfume is derived from the Latin perfume, meaning "through smoke." The art of perfumery was known to the ancient Egyptians. References to perfumery materials and even perfume formulas are found in the Ancient Egyptian Burial sites, Tombs and in the Bible. The burning of incense in religious rites of ancient China, Palestine, and Egypt led gradually to the personal use of perfume known as attar's, widespread in ancient Greece and Rome. During the Middle Ages Crusaders brought knowledge of perfumery to Europe from the East. After 1500 Paris was the major center of perfume-making.
Today Egypt is still a major trading center for the perfume industry. We have teamed up with the best perfume trading houses in Egypt.

What's the difference between perfume oils and perfume?
Please do not confuse these perfume oils with cologne or essential oils. Pure perfume, essences oils are far more sophisticated than perfume with fillers. Never offensive or overpowering, long lasting and balanced.We at My Egypt are honored to be able to offer you the best in fragrance - drop for drop we offer a superior product. Try us - we think you'll agree.

We will ship overseas. Please email us for shipping costs

Made in Egypt. Product of Egypt.

 

References

  1. ^ Lévai, Jessica (2007). Aspects of the Goddess Nephthys, Especially During the Graeco-Roman Period in Egypt. UMI.
  2. ^ Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition. Merriam-Webster, 2007. p. 56
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b Johnston 2004, p. 579.
  4. ^ Gryglewski 2002, p. 145.
  5. ^ Coulter & Turner 2000, p. 58.
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b "Gods and Religion in Ancient Egypt – Anubis". Archived from the original on 27 December 2002. Retrieved 23 June 2012.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g "Anubis". World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18 November 2018.
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b c "Anubis". Encyclopaedia Britannica. 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  9. ^ The canine referred to as the Egyptian jackal in older texts was recently biologically reclassified as a separate canid species more closely related to grey wolves and coyotes than golden jackals. Furthermore ancient Greek texts about Anubis constantly refer to the deity as having a dog's head, not jackal or wolf, and there is still uncertainty as to what canid represents Anubis. Therefore the Name and History section uses the names the original sources used but in quotation marks.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b Leprohon 1990, p. 164, citing Fischer 1968, p. 84 and Lapp 1986, pp. 8–9.
  11. ^ Conder 1894, p. 85.
  12. ^ "CDLI-Archival View". cdli.ucla.edu. Retrieved 20 September 2017.
  13. ^ Wilkinson 1999, p. 262.
  14. ^ Wilkinson 1999, pp. 280–81.
  15. ^ Wilkinson 1999, p. 262 (burials in shallow graves in Predynastic Egypt); Freeman 1997, p. 91 (rest of the information).
  16. ^ Wilkinson 1999, p. 262 ("fighting like with like" and "by jackals and other wild dogs").
  17. ^ Jump up to:a b Freeman 1997, p. 91.
  18. ^ Riggs 2005, pp. 166–67.
  19. ^ Jump up to:a b Hart 1986, p. 25.
  20. ^ Jump up to:a b c Hart 1986, p. 26.
  21. ^ Gryglewski 2002, p. 146.
  22. ^ Campbell, Price (2018). Ancient Egypt - Pocket Museum. Thames & Hudson. p. 266. ISBN 978-0-500-51984-4.
  23. ^ Lévai, Jessica (2007). Aspects of the Goddess Nephthys, Especially During the Graeco-Roman Period in Egypt. UMI.
  24. ^ Peacock 2000, pp. 437–38 (Hellenistic kingdom).
  25. ^ "Hermanubis | English | Dictionary & Translation by Babylon". Babylon.com. Retrieved 15 June 2012.
  26. ^ Jump up to:a b Riggs 2005, p. 166.
  27. ^ Hoerber 1963, p. 269 (for Cerberus and Hades).
  28. ^ E.g., Gorgias, 482b (Blackwood, Crossett & Long 1962, p. 318), or The Republic, 399e, 567e, 592a (Hoerber 1963, p. 268).
  29. ^ Jump up to:a b Hart 1986, pp. 23–24; Wilkinson 2003, pp. 188–90.
  30. ^ Jump up to:a b Vischak, Deborah (27 October 2014). Community and Identity in Ancient Egypt: The Old Kingdom Cemetery at Qubbet el-Hawa. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9781107027602.
  31. ^ Hart 1986, p. 23.
  32. ^ Armour 2001.
  33. ^ Zandee 1960, p. 255.
  34. ^ "The Gods of Ancient Egypt – Anubis". touregypt.net. Retrieved 29 June 2014.
  35. ^ Kinsley 1989, p. 178; Riggs 2005, p. 166 ("The motif of Anubis, or less frequently Hathor, leading the deceased to the afterlife was well-established in Egyptian art and thought by the end of the pharaonic era.").
  36. ^ Riggs 2005, pp. 127 and 166.
  37. ^ Riggs 2005, pp. 127–28 and 166–67.
  38. ^ Faulkner, Andrews & Wasserman 2008, p. 155.
  39. ^ "Museum Explorer / Death in Ancient Egypt – Weighing the heart". British Museum. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  40. ^ "Gods of Ancient Egypt: Anubis". Britishmuseum.org. Retrieved 15 June 2012.
  41. ^ Wilkinson 1999, p. 263.
  42. ^ Jump up to:a b c Hart 1986, p. 22.
  43. ^ Hart 1986, p. 22; Freeman 1997, p. 91.
  44. ^ Jump up to:a b "Ancient Egypt: the Mythology – Anubis". Egyptianmyths.net. Retrieved 15 June 2012.
  45. ^ Wilkinson 1999, p. 281.
  46. ^ Wilkinson 2003, pp. 188–90.

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